Glossary

  • Antenatal: Occurring before birth
  • Cardiovascular disease (CVD): Diseases of the heart or blood system
  • Cerebrovascular diseases: Diseases that are related to the blood supply to the brain
  • Co-morbidity: The relationship between the frequency of two diseases or conditions
  • Congenital: Defects or damage to a developing foetus, sometimes due to genetic factors
  • Coronary heart disease (CHD)
  • Decent Homes Standard: A government housing standard which requires all councils and housing associations to bring their properties up to a certain standard by 2010
  • Dementia: The effects of certain conditions on a person’s mental ability, personality and behaviour, often culminating in problems with memory and the skills needed to carry out everyday activities
  • Demography: The make up of the population
  • Deprivation: The state of poverty
  • Direct Payments: A financial payment made to someone who would normally receive a service from their local authorities’ Social Services department
  • Directly Standardised Rate:
  • Economically active: People who are either in employment or unemployed and receiving Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA)
  • Economically inactive: People who are neither in employment nor unemployed, including people on benefits other than Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA)
  • European Union (EU) Accession States: The 10 states that have most recently acceded to the European Union (Czech republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Bulgaria and Romania)
  • Genotype: The genotype is the genetic makeup of a cell, an organism, or an individual (in this case the hepatitis C virus) usually with reference to a specific character under consideration
  • Housing tenure: The financial arrangements under which someone has a right to live in a property, e.g. owned, privately rented, housing association, etc.
  • Hypertension: High blood pressure, usually when above 140/90 mm Hg
  • Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD): National measure of social deprivation that combines a number of indicators (e.g. housing deprivation, employment deprivation) into a single measure
  • Individual Budgets: A system by which several income streams are combined to provide a service user with a single budget allowing greater flexibility in the way they buy support to meet their needs
  • Ischemic heart disease (IHD): A disease characterised by reduced blood supply to the heart
  • Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JNSA): The Department of Health state that the JSNA is “a process that will identify the current and future health and wellbeing needs of a local population, informing the priorities and targets set by Local Area Agreements and leading to agreed commissioning priorities that will improve outcomes and reduce health inequalities”
  • Limiting Long Term Illness: Sometimes described as long term conditions (should this be the entry?). Health problems that require ongoing management over a period of years or decades.
  • Margin of error: A measure of accuracy in a survey. The larger a margin of error, the less reliable the results of the survey.
  • Mean: The sum of the data set divided by the number of points in that set. Often commonly referred to as the average. E.g. the mean of the data set: 2,2,2,3,3,6,7 is 3.6.
  • Median: The value that divides a data set into two parts so that there are an equal number of data points above and below that value. E.g. the median of the data set: 2,2,2,3,3,6,7 is 3.
  • Migration: The movement of people into or out of an area
  • Mode: The value in a data set that has the most data points at that value. E.g. the mode of the data set: 2,2,2,3,3,6,7 is 2.
  • Morbidity: The relative frequency of the occurrence of a disease
  • Mortality: An alternative term for death, usually used in connection of rates of death
  • Myocardial infarction (MI): A heart attack
  • National Indicator: One of the set of national performance indicators
  • Neighbourhood cohesion: A measure referring to the connections between people in a local area
  • Neonatal: Occurring within the first 28 days after birth
  • Nomis: The Office for National Statistics system for official labour market statistics
  • Outcomes: An outcome is an impact on a person, for the person which is planned, positive and attributable to the service. Many services have national outcome frameworks which define outcome areas. Adults Social Care have an outcomes framework of seven outcomes areas (Improved health and emotional wellbeing, improved quality of life, making a positive contribution, choice and control, discrimination and harassment, economic wellbeing and maintaining personal dignity and respect). Children’s services have an outcomes framework of five outcome areas (staying safe, being healthy, enjoying and achieving, achieving economic well-being and making a positive contribution).
  • Paraphernalia: Drug users’ equipment, including needles, syringes, filters, spoons and mixing containers
  • Palliative care: The care of patients with advanced progressive illnesses ?
  • Performance Indicator: A measure that is used as part of the assessment of the performance of a service
  • Perinatal: Pertaining to the period immediately before and after birth
  • Prevalence: The proportion of individuals in a population who have an existing illness, condition or need
  • Quartile: Any one of the three values that divide a quantity into four equal parts. Can also be used to refer to the data found in one of the four parts
  • Quintile: Any one of the four values that divide a quantity into five equal parts. Can also be used to refer to the data found in one of the five parts
  • Rate: The occurrence of events over a specific interval in time or a measure of the frequency of some phenomenon
  • Referrals, Assessments and Packages of Care: This is a social care performance return and is the official source for data on adult social care numbers in the UK
  • Risk/Harm Item or Factor: One of a set of ten key risks or harms which in young people may lead subsequently to dependency in adult life
  • Schizophrenia: A severe psychiatric disorder with symptoms of hallucinations and delusions
  • Self-Directed Support: A style of care and support whereby the service user's own care choices are delivered, rather than just the type of care traditionally offered by the Local Authority and support organisations. Usually delivered through Direct Payments of Individual Budgets.
  • Service Level Agreement (SLA): A service contract (or part thereof) where the level of service is formally defined
  • Social capital: A term referring to the connections between social networks
  • Social mobility: The possibility for people in a society to change their class or social status
  • Socioeconomic: Relating to or involving economic and social factors
  • Standard Deviation (SD): A measure of the variability or dispersion of a statistical population
  • Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR): ?
  • Stillborn: The delivery of a foetus that has died before birth
  • Super Output Areas (SOA): Small geographical unit with fixed boundaries used as a constant geographical unit unaffected by political boundaries
  • Telecare and Telehealth: Technology that brings health and social care directly to a user, generally in their homes. It covers social alarms, lifestyle monitoring and the remote monitoring of vital signs for diagnosis, assessment and prevention of illness
  • Third sector: Collective term for voluntary, charitable or not for profit organisations
  • Tier 1 (drug treatment services): information and advice, screening and referral to specialist drug treatment services, provided by non-drug specialists (e.g. primary care)
  • Tier 2 (drug treatment services): information and advice by specialist drug services, triage assessment, referral to structured drug treatment, brief psychosocial interventions, harm reduction services (such as needle exchange) and aftercare
  • Tier 3 (drug treatment services): community-based drug assessment and structured treatment (including community prescribing, psychosocial interventions, and day programmes)
  • Tier 4 (drug treatment services): residential treatment, such as NHS inpatient units and voluntary sector rehabs
  • Trend: A long-term movement in an ordered series, say a time series, which may be regarded, together with the oscillation and random component, as generating the observed values
  • Vascular disease: A disease relating to the blood vessels
  • Working Age: Usually defined as adults aged 16 – 64 years. Some older measures will define it as males aged 16 – 64 and females aged 16 – 59. Adult Social Care usually defines working age as all adults aged 18 – 64

 

 

Top of page